work

Nikon
Behind The Moment

Nikon are faced with a paradox: people take more pictures than ever, but are less interested in cameras than ever. So to reignite passions for dedicated cameras they worked with the Telegraph to create the kind of photo that only a DSLR can take.nNikon are faced with a paradox: people take more pictures than ever, but are less interested in cameras than ever. So to reignite passions for dedicated cameras they worked with the Telegraph to create the kind of photo that only a DSLR can take.

Understanding

The rise of smartphones means photography is dying.

“Photography has never been so popular, but it’s getting destroyed. There have never been so many photographs taken, but photography is dying”

– Antonio Olmas, award-winning photographer

The camera marketplace continues to decline vs the proliferation of mobile phone cameras. However, people’s love of imagery has sky-rocketed: 1.8 billion images are uploaded per day to social media.

We needed to find an environment that contained a group of people passionate about imagery, and demonstrate the quality of a DSLR camera over anything they may already have. Inspiring brand awareness would be key, as we know that brand loyalty tends to be very strong post-first purchase.

Solution

Nikon realised people are more interested in ‘making of’ content than adverts.

Recently Nikon have seen a greater interest in their behind-the-scenes and making of AV spots, than the 30” spots themselves. This led us to pursue a content-led solution as a means of communicating a more meaningful message to our audience.

We wanted to encourage the first step into the DSLR market by inspiring the audience, and showing what can be done with an entry level DSLR camera that they could never do with their mobile phone camera.

Inspired by Salvador Dali, and his capturing of one perfect image, we created a show-stopping image of our own.

Execution

A yellow rose, liquid nitrogen, a rifle, ballet dancers, a Nikon and a lot of patience.

Following a week of tease adverts in The Telegraph, we announced our execution with a coverwrap of the Telegraph magazine alongside the full length video. The stunning image showed a frozen rose, exploding in mid-air as it is pierced by a bullet, directly over the heads of twirling ballet dancers.

An online hub housed all of the content from the campaign including The Moment image itself, a gallery of behind the scenes photos, the ‘how we did it’ film, slow-mo vignettes, how to guides, and a competition to win a Nikon camera and masterclass. It was essential to convert mobile phone photographers, so bespoke sites were created for mobile browsing, as well as impactful gif-based traffic drivers to capture their attention. Social was also used across a multitude of Telegraph platforms – this included the very first commercial message on Telegraph’s Instagram platform, and were the first UK commercial partner with Apple News. Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Unruly further extended reach and impact.

 

Results

Significant shifts across all metrics that translated in to a 16% increase in sales The campaign also over-delivered by 20% for unique users, with an average dwell time of 1:47 and over 12,500 competition entries. On social media through Telegraph alone, we saw a huge 2.7m impacts around our content too.

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