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Our internet picks of the week – 5 Mar ’20

There is a big difference between diversity and inclusion and, all too frequently, representation is seen as enough to tick the diversity box. But inclusion is the real goal for advertisers, this goes beyond a token gesture and demonstrates that a brand truly understands the needs of their audience. It requires thought, passion and - often - many difficult conversations with decision makers that simply don’t get it. In honour of International Women’s Day, this week we take a look at campaigns that are seeking to change the narrative around gender.

Fashion stalwart Diane von Furstenberg and Mastercard have teamed up to improve the retail experiences of shoppers, by implementing tech to help store associates make informed recommendations amongst other things. The partnership will use Mastercard technology to tell stories about women’s contributions, explore in-store art galleries, and find tales behind designs using PR codes. As well as the retail tech endeavour, Mastercard will team up with DVF for their third celebration of International Women’s Day, which will include panels and discussions with female thought leaders, featuring von Furstenberg herself.

Mastercard and DVF Partner for Female Empowerment

As we are approaching International Women’s day Reebok have brought back their “It’s a Man’s World” campaign, inspired by their 2001 campaign “It’s A Woman’s World”. The revisited campaign follows a series of collaborative sneakers created with women breaking standards and making their mark in male-dominated industries. The female created collection has been built to celebrate a powerful you.

It’s A Man’s World

The Scottish Government is literally trying to change the narrative with its new campaign aimed at ending shame around using the word period. With more than half the population experiencing this natural body function, the campaign seeks to tackle the issue of period shaming that one in three women in the UK have suffered from. Running across cinema, TV, print, outdoor and online, the campaign is starting an open conversation that strives to make everyone more comfortable talking about periods.

End the stigma. Period.

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